Lean cutting cycle

I try to apply “lean thinking” into all aspects of life, not just to work and certainly not just to construction projects (if you ever meet me in person, ask me to tell you how I manage my family’s weekly grocery list). When trying to inspire lean thinking in others, I encourage them to pick something that bugs them – it doesn’t matter what it is – and work their way backwards from there. The goal is to make life easier by reducing waste and/or add value; finding ways to simplify the process by speeding up or eliminating steps and handoffs wherever possible.

I am working on implementing OEE in one of our machines that makes centertubes for automotive oil filters. The steel is rolled and each part number has specific diameter and length. However, the run-rates vary for each part numbers. I am somewhat able to calculate Takt time for each part number based on the standard run-rate. However, the problem for me is to determine Ideal Cycle Time. The machine can run as fast as 65 PPM for one part number while it runs as slow as 13 PPM for some other part number. In this case, what would be the optimal way to calculate Ideal Cycle Time for each part numbers? As you know, Ideal Cycle time is required to calculate Performance Metric of OEE.

Facilities (land, buildings, equipment) provide the physical capability to add value and create products. The most common manifestation of facility planning (or lack thereof) is the Plant Layout . An effective layout incorporates and enables the manufacturing strategy on which it is based. Lean strategy starts with workflow and workflow is the result of process and layout. Mr. Lee has authored two books and many articles on Plant Layout and Facility Planning. His approach is organized, practical and systematic.

Lean cutting cycle

lean cutting cycle

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