Mastoiditis ct scan

Acute bacterial (suppurative) otomastoiditis responds to antibiotic treatment; radiologic study is required only when there is clinical suggestion of coalescent mastoiditis, intracranial complications, or an underlying chronic disease. Computed tomography (CT) is the method of choice for evaluating otogenic intra- or extra-cranial complications. CT scans can show stages of disease progression when infection has spread by way of soft tissue, blood, and bone pathways into the dural venous sinuses, meninges, labyrinth, facial nerves, epidural and other intracranial spaces. When there is clinical suggestion of acute coalescent mastoiditis, a CT scan of the temporal bone can confirm the presence of rarefying osteitis, coalescence of the air cells, and subperiosteal abscess.

During the course of antibiotic treatment, serial white blood cell count and temperature are closely monitored. Typically, the intravenous antibiotics are continued until the person has no fever for at least 24 to 48 hours, then equivalent antibiotics by mouth can be given for a total of 2–week duration of treatment. [25] Intravenous fluids may be administered to compensate for the reduced oral intake, insensible losses (due to the raised temperature) and vasodilation and to optimize urine output. Percutaneous nephrostomy or ureteral stent placement may be indicated to relieve obstruction caused by a stone. Children with acute pyelonephritis can be treated effectively with oral antibiotics ( cefixime , ceftibuten and amoxicillin/clavulanic acid ) or with short courses (2 to 4 days) of intravenous therapy followed by oral therapy. [26] If intravenous therapy is chosen, single daily dosing with aminoglycosides is safe and effective. [26]

Objective: To evaluate the sensitivity and accuracy of temporal bone CT findings for the diagnosis of acute coalescent mastoiditis. Design: CT scans were blindly scored for mastoid bone integrity (air cell septae, sigmoid cortical plate, and lateral cortical wall) by an otologist and 2 neuroradiologists. Scores were analyzed to determine their sensitivity and specificity for acute coalescent mastoiditis. Subjects: Twenty-one patients with acute coalescent mastoiditis or acute noncoalescent mastoiditis and 12 patients with chronic mastoiditis. Setting: Academic tertiary care facility. Results: Pair-wise interobserver agreement was good to excellent (κ = to ) for the sigmoid plate, the lateral cortex, and the septae. Scores for the sigmoid plate were significantly greater (indicative of greater bone destruction) in the coalescent group than in either the noncoalescent group or the chronic group ( P < ). Within the coalescent group, scores were highest for the sigmoid plate, followed by the septae and the lateral wall. Sensitivity and specificity for coalescent mastoiditis were both highest for the sigmoid plate (67% and 90%, respectively). Conclusions: Erosion of the cortical plate overlying the sigmoid sinus is the most sensitive and specific CT finding for distinguishing coalescent from noncoalescent acute mastoiditis. (Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg 1999;120:350-4.)

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Mastoiditis ct scan

mastoiditis ct scan

Do not consider Communities as medical advice. Never delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your doctor or other qualified healthcare provider because of something you have read on WebMD. You should always speak with your doctor before you start, stop, or change any prescribed part of your care plan or treatment. WebMD understands that reading individual, real-life experiences can be a helpful resource, but it is never a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment from a qualified health care provider. If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your doctor or dial 911 immediately.

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