Test cycle leangains

On the IF/LG front, I’ve been following it for the last couple of years and have found it fascinating how simple compound movements can add so much mass while dropping bf%. I’m far from my goal due to several distractions, but still amazed at how easy it is to cohere to this lifestyle for the most part. I’m glad you are sharing this with the world. How are your results with RPT? I started off IF/LG with Starting Strength and then switched over to Wendler’s 5/3/1, now that my strength is decent, I’m considering the switch over to RPT. Would love to hear your thoughts!

Stress induces autoimmune disorders by affecting the immune response modulation. Recent studies have shown that shift work stress may enhance the onset of the autoimmune Graves hyperthyroidism . On the other hand, the possible association between occupational stress and autoimmune hypothyroidism has not yet been investigated…. Subclinical autoimmune hypothyroidism was diagnosed in percent shift workers and in percent day-time workers with a statistically significant difference: Odds Ratio (OR) , 95 percent Confidence Interval (CI) to ; p=…. Our data show a significant association between shift work and autoimmune hypothyroidism. This finding may have implications in the health surveillance programs. [3]

Under glycolysis, you must first deplete blood-glucose and glycogen stores in order to begin utilizing fats as energy, but the breakdown of fat must then compete with the breakdown of muscle-mass. The result of this competition or duel catabolism is about as much muscle-mass lost as fat. This can of course be largely avoided thru ketosis since under ketosis body-fat is the first and primary source of energy. Ketosis is muscle-sparing for the simple reason that proteins no longer compete with fatty acids for energy utilization. Under ketosis, protein is a secondary energy source and thus muscle-mass is largely spared.

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Well, obviously as you get more advanced and your volume threshold increases, your volume *tolerance* also increases – so auto-regulation takes care of it, at least within reason. However, you still have to monitor progress and determine whether what you are doing is working for you. Even with an effective training method and a “perfect” program there is still no guarantees. The downside of auto-regulation is that some may not be able to push themselves to the point where optimal progress is realized. Let’s say you started grinding on rep 6 and thought to yourself “ok, I’ll stop here, this is an RPE 9”. Then someone offered you a million dollars if you could get to 10 reps, and if not you they would empty your bank accounts and kill your family. Could you get 10 reps? Just a thought experiment, of course…

I played around half-assedly with this idea a year or so back. After reading your article I’m giving it an honest shot. I’m three weeks in, working out twice a week about 45 minutes each session. And I like it. Now, I am adding a twist to it. A twist that has no other merit to it (to my knowledge, that’s why I’m asking you) than that it feels “good”. I came across this page advocating “eccentric isometrics” (couldn’t figure out how to add the link in the comment, can provide it if you want it), basically a slow eccentric phase, a couple of second long static hold at the bottom, then a strong, determined, explosive contraction. My feeling is that it works well for some exercises (squats, DL’s, presses). Perhaps even better that just the slow eccentric followed by slow concentric movement. If you have an opinion, I would be very interested in knowing it. Thoughts or experiences?

Test cycle leangains

test cycle leangains

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